Category Archives: Undergraduate

Show’em What You Know: CLEP Exams

Getting College Credit For Your Knowledge And Experience

Adults considering college have the opportunity to receive credit for knowledge they  gained through work or study. CLEP exams are also a valuable option for home-schooled students to earn college credit and reduce the time and cost associated with a college degree. The CLEP exam is offered through the College Board just like the SAT and AP exams. This exam is offered in 33 subjects including:

 

  • American Literature
  • English Literature
  • French Language Level 1 and 2
  • German Language Level 1 and 2
  • Spanish Language Level 1 and 2
  • American Government
  • US History 1
  • US History 2
  • Biology
  • Calculus
  • Financial Accounting
  • Introduction to Business Law
  • Principles of Management

 

Registration  fee for each test is $85.  However, military personnel may take the test free of charge, if qualified for DANTES funding.  The score range is 20-80. A passing score on the CLEP tests, with the exception of the language tests, is 50. For the  French exam the recommended score is 59, while the recommended scores for German and Spanish are 60 and 63 respectively. CLEP testing centers regularly offer exams, unlike AP tests which are offered each spring. For information about the CLEP exams, test centers, practice tests and registration go to CLEP. 

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Show’em What You Know: AP Exams

Getting College Credit For Your Knowledge And Experience

Whether you are a high school student or an adult considering a college degree, there are options for you to earn credit for courses and knowledge you have acquired.  The advantage to these are a shorter time in college and as a result reduced cost of your college degree.

High school students may be familiar with Advanced Placement or AP Courses. These are  advanced classes taken in high school that equate to introductory college level courses. Once students have completed the AP courses, they can then register for the individual subject matter tests. AP tests are scheduled in the spring. There are 38 subject matter tests offered by the College Board.

Here is a sample list:

  • Art History
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Calculus
  • Chinese Language and Culture
  • French Language and Culture
  • German Language and Culture
  • Government and Politics (Comparative)
  • Government and Politics (US)
  • Psychology
  • Studio Art Drawing
  • US History
  • World History

Scoring on the AP tests range from 1-5 and colleges generally award college credit for students who score 3-5 on their individual tests. Colleges their own policies regarding the awarding of credit for AP tests. The fee per test is $94. However, if you have a financial hardship, you may qualify for a $32 Fee Reduction per test.  For more information about the AP exams, practice tests and registration go to APTEST.

Too Late to Change Fall Plans?

It’s late July and all your friends are busy prepping for their first semester at college, while you are still trying to find a job or working in a job you know you don’t want to spend years at. You are beginning to regret not applying to college and are wondering if it is too late.

If this is your situation, know that you still have options for attending college in the fall.

First be aware that many colleges public and private, have Rolling Admissions. Rolling Admissions means that the institution accepts applications generally through the first two weeks of the semester. However, if you are looking for on-campus housing, acceptance in to a highly competitive program, or need significant financial aid, you will probably be out of luck.

That being said, you should talk to an admission counselor, financial aid counselor, or your private college planner as soon as possible.

Here are some tips to help you get into college this fall.

Apply as soon as possible for admissions and financial aid. The sooner you complete the application process, the sooner they can review and accept your application.

Find out if you need SAT or ACT scores. You may not need either if applying to a community college.

If you can’t decide on a major, consider General Studies or Liberal Arts. This particularly true if you need financial aid, as you must be enrolled in a degree or certificate program to be eligible for financial aid.

If you can’t afford to attend full time, take a course or two (whatever you can afford). Then you can take your time and work with a college planner to outline a plan to start fulltime in the Spring term or the next academic year.

Even taking a course or two at a local two year or four state college, can be used to your advantage when applying to college or university you want to attend full time. It shows you are: 1) capable of college level work and 2) you can manage your time effectively, especially if you are balancing work and school.

So take heart, you still have options if you want to start college this fall. Now get moving!! And good luck.

Healthcare Questions for Students Planning to Study Abroad

Many college students are in the midst of planning their summer and fall study abroad  activities including making their final choice of study abroad location, calculating the costs, determining what travel documents are needed, flight reservations, etc. One area that should not be overlooked is healthcare. In addition, to the obvious question regarding the need for vaccinations, several other questions need to be answered. Do you need health insurance? Are you able to bring your prescription? Are there over- the-counter drugs that you should carry?

US NEWS has an explanation of these issues in Questions Students Should Ask About Healthcare Abroad. Be  sure to check it out.